Materials

The material of the slow feeding net is of course very important:

Cotton: (poor choice)

  • Absorbs lots of water which makes it very dirty and makes it freeze hard in cold temperatures.
  • Low break load.
  • Withstand abrasion quite poorly.

Polyethylene: (poor choice)

  • Does not absorb water.
  • Low break load.
  • Withstands abrasion quite poorly.
  • Withstands UV-light poorly.

Polypropylene: (okay choice)

  • Does not absorb water.
  • Fair break load.
  • Withstands abrasion fairly.
  • Withstands UV-light fairly.

Nylon: (okay choice)

  • Absorbs less water than cotton but more than all the others which means that it becomes dirty and freezes stiff in cold climates.
  • Fair break load.
  • Withstands abrasion fairly.
  • Withstands UV-light fairly.

Polyester: (Good choice)

  • Absorbs less water than cotton and Nylon but more than the others.
  • Good break load.
  • Withstands abrasion well.
  • Withstands UV-light well.

Dyneema: (Good choice but very expensive)

  • Does not absorb water.
  • Fantastic break load.
  • Low weight.
  • Withstands abrasion as good as polyester.
  • Withstands UV-light Excellently.
  • Very expensive.

It is of course not only the material that is important. Thickness, weight and knitting technique must be compared too.

Thickness and weight are very important and easy to compare but the differences on the market are enormous, some nets are made for deep sea fishing and others for badminton even though the material can be the same. When it comes to knitting technique it is much more difficult because two techniques might be the same for the fishing industry but very different for horse feeding.

Since I have tested all materials and all models personally, of course I have a favorite. All material specialists say that polyester is the best material and I agree. I can however say that I was very surprised when I discovered that the traditional knitting technique was not the best. “By mistake” I found one that is remarkably better when feeding horses (but apparently the same for the fishing industry.